ALERT: One Of America’s Most POPULAR Potato Chip Brands Just Issued MASSIVE Recall- Throw Them Away NOW

ALERT– PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
This is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product can cause serious, adverse health consequences.
Frito-Lay Recalls Jalapeño Flavored Lay’s Kettle Cooked Potato Chips and Jalapeño Flavored Miss Vickie’s Kettle Cooked Potato Chips Due to Potential Presence of Salmonella
Frito-Lay today announced it is voluntarily recalling select Jalapeño Flavored Lay’s Kettle Cooked potato chips and Jalapeño Flavored Miss Vickie’s Kettle Cooked potato chips due to the potential presence of Salmonella in the seasoning.
Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.
Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.
This action is the direct result of a supplier’s recent recall of a seasoning blend which includes jalapeño powder that could contain Salmonella. Although no Salmonella was found in the seasoning supplied to Frito-Lay, the company has decided to recall these products out of an abundance of caution.
No illness related to this matter has been confirmed to date.
The products covered by this recall were distributed in retail stores and via foodservice, vending and other channels throughout the U.S.
The specific recalled product information is listed below:
All sizes of the following two products that have a “guaranteed fresh” date of JUL 4 or prior printed on the front upper panel of the package:
  • Jalapeño Flavored Lay’s Kettle Cooked potato chips
  • Jalapeño Flavored Miss Vickie’s Kettle Cooked potato chips
All of the following multipack offerings that have a “use by” date of JUN 20 or prior printed on the multipack package. In addition, a “guaranteed fresh” date of JUL 4 or prior is printed on the front upper panel of the individual recalled product packages inside each multipack offering. Any other products or flavors contained in these multipacks are not being recalled.
  • 12 count Lay’s Kettle Cooked Multipack Sack
  • 20 count Frito-Lay Bold Mix Sack
  • 30 count Miss Vickie’s Multipack Tray
  • 30 count Lay’s Kettle Cooked Multipack Tray
  • 32 count Miss Vickie’s Multipack Box
No other flavors of Lay’s Kettle Cooked potato chips or Miss Vickie’s potato chips are impacted or being recalled. Jalapeño Cheddar Flavored Lay’s Kettle Cooked 40% Less Fat potato chips are not impacted or being recalled.
Consumers who have purchased these recalled products are advised not to consume them. Frito-Lay is working with the FDA on this recall to ensure the recalled products are removed from store shelves and are no longer distributed.
Consumers can contact Frito-Lay Consumer Relations at 866-272-9393 for additional information from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST. Representative product images can be found at fritolay.com. For product reimbursement, consumers can visit www.jalapenochiprecall.com.
This is extremely important information and we urge you to share this with your friends and family.
God Bless.

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“Warrior puppy” rescued from death brings new hope for 8-year-old autistic boy!

This is a story of not just any boy and not just any dog: An eight-year-old autistic boy spent his days alone, playing by himself, until the family adopted a pup that was rescued from the brink of death. Following is just the beginning of a miraculous journey!
Jonny Hickey was an extremely awkward and quiet child who hated to communicate with anybody. He could barely speak. He would spend hours playing alone with his marbles and dreaded any kind of new experiences.

Xena was a severely abused dog being taken care of by rescuers when Jonny’s family decided to adopt this pitiable soul.

Just two months after Xena came into his life, Jonny transformed completely. He is now extremely happy, cheerful, and playful when he is with his new friend. The parents have noticed that he is a lot more social now.

Johny now says that he and Xena make a “pretty perfect team” and kisses the puppy on the top of her head.

Just a couple of months before Xena was taken into Jonny’s world, the poor pup was brought to the DeKalb County Animal Services’ shelter in Georgia after she collapsed in someone’s yard. When staff members saw her, they recoiled in shock. “I’ve been doing rescue probably for about 12 years, and I had never seen a dog that young in that sort of condition,” Chrissy Kaczynski, who works for Animal Services and is a founding member of the rescue group Friends of DeKalb Animals, told TODAY.com. “I brought her home with me and I didn’t think she’d make it through the night.” “She was completely dehydrated and her nose was all scabbed over … like she had been trying to escape something,” Kaczynski said.

In the photo below, Xena is seen recovering and surrounded by the food and medicine that pulled her back from the brink of death. With ample food, fluids, and loads of love, the pup found the strength to fight for her life, earning her nickname “Warrior Puppy.”
Being autistic, Johny had faced difficulty interacting and expressing himself. He used to be uncomfortable making eye contact with people. But ever since Xena came into his life, he has changed dramatically. His mother noticed that he now readily cuddles and kisses the terrier, and has become more tactile and expressive.

Both Jonny and Xena are now an inseparable pair as they fill each other’s lives with loads of love. Xena is now his best friend. His mother, Linda Hickey, 44, said in an interview with Today.com: “These two were destined to be together, to save each other at a level that humans just can’t understand.” “From the very first day, that dog was sitting in his lap in the car seat, giving him all these kisses. And that’s where she’s been ever since,” she said. The part-time preschool teacher said her son now chatters non-stop, telling her about his day at school.
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Jonny has learned to express love.

Research on the effects of companion animals on children with autism spectrum disorder shows they are more likely to talk and laugh in the presence of guinea pigs than in the presence of toys. The Autism Service Dogs of America pairs children with specially trained animals that have a calming effect on these children.

“Well, my Xena was hurt really bad by some not-so-nice people. And I have autism. So I think we make a pretty perfect team to spread the words to be nice to animals, and nice to kids like me,” Jonny says in the CNN video below!

The story of the amazing bond between a little boy and his dog indeed testifies that love needs no language.
Watch the CNN video below:


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Johnny Depp Intends To Buy Site Of Wounded Knee Massacre And Gift It Back To The Native American People

Actor Johnny Depp wants to purchase the historical landmark Wounded Knee and gift it back to the Native American people to help make right what went so wrong in 1890.Actor Johnny Depp disclosed that he intends to buy Wounded Knee, a national historic landmark, and gift it back to the Indian people. He shared that he is ready to spend millions in order to give control back to those that should have inherited the land, and help make right what went so wrong back in 1890.
“It’s very sacred ground and many atrocities were committed against the Sioux there,” he said. “And in the 1970s there was a stand-off between the Feds (Federal government) and the people who should own that land. This historical land is so important to the Sioux culture and all I want to do is buy it and give it back. Why doesn’t the government do that?”
Perhaps it was Depp’s stint playing the role of Tonto in the box office production The Lone Ranger that inspired him to pursue such action; whatever the inspiration, the activism will most certainly be appreciated by many.

Depp spent a massive amount of time doing research about the various tribes and received the approval from many Native American groups before the filming of The Lone Ranger began. His respect for the Native American culture runs deep, and he wanted to make sure that all those involved with the production were doing right by “the Indian” in the way they portrayed the various tribes.
“The idea was to give back to them and to make sure that we got it right,” he said in the lengthy interview.

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The Truth About Hair And Why Natives Would Keep Their Hair Long

Our culture leads people to believe that hair style is a matter of personal preference, that hair style is a matter of fashion and/or convenience, and that how people wear their hair is simply a cosmetic issue. Back in the Vietnam war however, an entirely different picture emerged, one that has been carefully covered up and hidden from public view.

In the early nineties, Sally [name changed to protect privacy] was married to a licensed psychologist who worked at a VA Medical hospital. He worked with combat veterans with PTSD, post traumatic stress disorder. Most of them had served in Viet Nam.

Sally said: “I remember clearly an evening when my husband came back to our apartment on Doctor’s Circle carrying a thick official looking folder in his hands. Inside were hundreds of pages of certain studies commissioned by the government. He was in shock from the contents. What he read in those documents completely changed his life. From that moment on my conservative middle of the road husband grew his hair and beard and never cut them again. What is more, the VA Medical center let him do it, and other very conservative men in the staff followed his example. As I read the documents, I learned why. It seems that during the Viet Nam War special forces in the war department had sent undercover experts to comb American Indian Reservations looking for talented scouts, for tough young men trained to move stealthily through rough terrain. They were especially looking for men with outstanding, almost supernatural, tracking abilities. Before being approached, these carefully selected men were extensively documented as experts in tracking and survival.
With the usual enticements, the well proven smooth phrases used to enroll new recruits, some of these Indian trackers were then enlisted. Once enlisted, an amazing thing happened. Whatever talents and skills they had possessed on the reservation seemed to mysteriously disappear, as recruit after recruit failed to perform as expected in the field.
Serious causalities and failures of performance led the government to contract expensive testing of these recruits, and this is what was found.
When questioned about their failure to perform as expected, the older recruits replied consistently that when they received their required military haircuts, they could no longer ’sense’ the enemy, they could no longer access a ’sixth sense’ , their ’intuition’ no longer was reliable, they couldn’t ’read’ subtle signs as well or access subtle extrasensory information.
So the testing institute recruited more Indian trackers, let them keep their long hair, and tested them in multiple areas. Then they would pair two men together who had received the same scores on all the tests. They would let one man in the pair keep his hair long, and gave the other man a military haircut. Then the two men retook the tests.
Time after time the man with long hair kept making high scores. Time after time, the man with the short hair failed the tests in which he had previously scored high scores.
Here is a typical test:
The recruit is sleeping out in the woods. An armed ’enemy’ approaches the sleeping man. The long haired man is awakened out of his sleep by a strong sense of danger and gets away long before the enemy is close, long before any sounds from the approaching enemy are audible.
In another version of this test the long haired man senses an approach and somehow intuits that the enemy will perform a physical attack. He follows his ’sixth sense’ and stays still, pretending to be sleeping, but quickly grabs the attacker and ’kills’ him as the attacker reaches down to strangle him.
This same man, after having passed these and other tests, then received a military haircut and consistently failed these tests, and many other tests that he had previously passed.
So the document recommended that all Indian trackers be exempt from military haircuts. In fact, it required that trackers keep their hair long.”
Comment:
The mammalian body has evolved over millions of years. Survival skills of human and animal at times seem almost supernatural. Science is constantly coming up with more discoveries about the amazing abilities of man and animal to survive. Each part of the body has highly sensitive work to perform for the survival and well being of the body as a whole.The body has a reason for every part of itself.
Hair is an extension of the nervous system, it can be correctly seen as exteriorized nerves, a type of highly evolved \’feelers\’ or \’antennae\’ that transmit vast amounts of important information to the brainstem, the limbic system, and the neocortex.
Not only does hair in people, including facial hair in men, provide an information highway reaching the brain, hair also emits energy, the electromagnetic energy emitted by the brain into the outer environment. This has been seen in Kirlian photography when a person is photographed with long hair and then rephotographed after the hair is cut.
When hair is cut, receiving and sending transmissions to and from the environment are greatly hampered. This results in numbing-out .
Cutting of hair is a contributing factor to unawareness of environmental distress in local ecosystems. It is also a contributing factor to insensitivity in relationships of all kinds. It contributes to sexual frustration.
Conclusion:
In searching for solutions for the distress in our world, it may be time for us to consider that many of our most basic assumptions about reality are in error. It may be that a major part of the solution is looking at us in the face each morning when we see ourselves in the mirror.

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Sugar: should we eliminate it from our diet?

Sugar seems to have developed a reputation as the big bad wolf in relation to health. Medical News Today have reported on numerous studies associating sugar intake with increased aging, cardiovascular disease, obesity and even cancer. Such research has led to many health experts around the globe calling for reductions in recommended sugar intake, with some saying we should cut out sugar completely. But is it really that bad for our health? We investigate.



Put simply, sugar is a crystalline carbohydrate that makes foods taste sweet. There are many different types of sugar, including glucose, fructose, lactose, maltose and sucrose - also known as table sugar.

Some of these sugars, such as glucose, fructose and lactose, occur naturally in fruits, vegetables and other foods. But many of the foods we consume contain "added" sugars - sugar that we add to a product ourselves to enhance the flavor or sugar that has been added to a product by a manufacturer.
The most common sources of added sugars include soft drinks, cakes, pies, chocolate, fruit drinks and desserts. Just a single can of cola can contain up to 7 tsps of added sugar, while an average-sized chocolate bar can contain up to 6 tsps.
It is added sugars that have been cited as a contributor to many health problems. In December 2014, MNT reported on a study in the journal Open Heart claiming added sugars may increase the risk of high blood pressure, even more so than sodium. And in February 2014, a study led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) associated high added sugar intake with increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Perhaps most strongly, added sugars have been associated with the significant increase in obesity. In the US, more than a third of adults are obese, while the rate of childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents over the past 30 years.
A 2013 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggested that consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages increases weight gain in both children and adults, while a review paper from the World Health Organization (WHO) notes an increase in the consumption of such beverages correlates with the increase in obesity.

Are we becoming addicted to sugar?

In support of these associations is Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric endocrinologist at the University of California-San Francisco and author of the book Fat Chance: The Hidden Truth About Sugar, who claims sugar is a "toxic" substance that we are becoming addicted to.
A 2008 study by researchers from Princeton University, NJ, found rats used to consuming a high-sugar diet displayed signs of binging, craving and withdrawal when their sugar intake was reduced.
"We need to wean ourselves off. We need to de-sweeten our lives. We need to make sugar a treat, not a diet staple," Dr. Lustig told The Guardianin 2013.
"The food industry has made it into a diet staple because they know when they do you buy more," he added. "This is their hook. If some unscrupulous cereal manufacturer went out and laced your breakfast cereal with morphine to get you to buy more, what would you think of that? They do it with sugar instead."
In her popular blog, Goop, Gwyneth Paltrow cites sugar addiction as one of the reasons she decided to quit sugar completely.
"The bottom line is that sugar works the addiction and reward pathways in the brain in much the same way as many illegal drugs," she writes. "Sugar is basically a socially acceptable, legal, recreational drug with deadly consequences."

Statistics show that we are certainly a nation of added-sugar lovers. According to a report from the CDC, adults in the US consumed around 13% of their total daily calorie intake from added sugars between 2005-2010, while 16% of children's and adolescents' total calorie intake came from added sugars between 2005-2008.
These levels are well above those currently recommended by WHO, which state we should consume no more than 10% of total daily calories from "free" sugars - both naturally occurring sugars and those that are added to products by the manufacturer.
In 2013, however, MNT reported on a study by Prof. Wayne Potts and colleagues from the University of Utah, claiming that even consuming added sugars at recommended levels may be harmful to health, after finding that such levels reduced lifespan in mice.

Is eliminating sugar from our diet healthy?

The array of studies reporting the negative implications of added sugar led to WHO making a proposal to revise their added sugar recommendations in 2014. The organization issued a draft guideline stating they would like to halve their recommended daily free sugar intake from 10% to 5%.
"The objective of this guideline is to provide recommendations on the consumption of free sugars to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases in adults and children," WHO explained, "with a particular focus on the prevention and control of weight gain and dental caries."
In addition, it seems many health experts, nutritionists and even celebrities like Gwyneth have jumped on a "no sugar" bandwagon. But is it even possible to completely eliminate sugar from a diet? And is it safe?
Biochemist Leah Fitzsimmons, of the University of Birmingham in the UK, told The Daily Mail:
"Cutting all sugar from your diet would be very difficult to achieve. Fruits, vegetables, dairy products and dairy replacements, eggs, alcohol and nuts all contain sugar, which would leave you with little other than meat and fats to eat - definitely not very healthy."
Many people turn to artificial sweeteners as a sugar alternative, but according to a study reported by MNT in 2014, these sweeteners may still drive diabetes and obesity.
The study, published in the journal Nature, suggests artificial sweeteners - including saccharin, sucralose and aspartame - interfere with gut bacteria, increasing the activity of pathways associated with obesity and diabetes.
What is more, they found long-term consumption of artificial sweeteners was associated with increased weight, abdominal obesity, higher fasting blood glucose levels and increased glycosylated hemoglobin levels.
"Together with other major shifts that occurred in human nutrition, this increase in artificial sweetener consumption coincides with the dramatic increase in the obesity and diabetes epidemics," the authors note. "Our findings suggest that artificial sweeteners may have directly contributed to enhancing the exact epidemic that they themselves were intended to fight."

Sugar can be part of a healthy, balanced diet

Instead of steering away from sugar completely, many health experts believe it can be consumed as part of a healthy diet, with some noting that sugar also has benefits.
"Like all sources of calories, sugars can be consumed within a healthy, balanced diet and active lifestyle," Dr. Alison Boyd, director of Sugar Nutrition UK, told MNT. "Sugars can often help to make certain nutritious foods more palatable, which can promote variety in a healthy, balanced diet."
Some researchers say our bodies even need sugar. "It's our body's preferred fuel," Dr. David Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University in New Haven, CT, told CNN. "There's a role for sugar in our diet. After all, what's the point of being healthy if it's not to enjoy living?"

The American Heart Association (AHA) - who recommend women should consume no more than 100 calories a day (6 tsps) and men should consume no more than 150 calories a day (9 tsps) from added sugars - disagrees, stating that our bodies do not need sugar to function properly.
"Added sugars contribute additional calories and zero nutrients to food," they add. But even the AHA do not recommend cutting out sugar completely.

Tips to reduce sugar intake

While sugar can be a part of a healthy diet, Dr. Katz makes an important point that almost all health experts agree with - "we eat too much of it" - which is evident from the aforementioned reports by the CDC.
As such, health experts recommend reducing sugar intake to within recommended guidelines. The AHA provide some tips to help do just that:
  • Cut back on the amount of sugar you may regularly add to foods and drinks, such as tea, coffee, cereal and pancakes
  • Replace sugar-sweetened beverages with sugar-free or low-calorie drinks
  • Compare food labels and select the products with the lowest amounts of added sugars
  • When baking cakes, reduce the amount of sugar in the recipe by a third
  • Try replacing sugar in recipes with extracts or spices, such as cinnamon, ginger, almond or vanilla
  • Replace sugar on cereal or oatmeal with fruit.

More needs to be done to ensure the public lower their sugar intake

While there are things we can do ourselves to reduce sugar intake, Prof. Wayne Potts told MNT that more needs to be done to encourage us to do so:
"The disease states are a terrible scourge to individuals and the cost to public health care is tremendous. Since individual behavior can make major advances, we should use a variety of methods such as public awareness campaigns, taxation and more firm regulation."
Dr. Boyd pointed out that the food industry has worked hard to offer the general public a good range of sugar-free and no-added-sugar products. "Soft drinks are one good example," she says, "with more than 60% available on the market now being low calorie/no added sugar."
She added, however, that foods lower in sugar may not necessarily be lower in calories. "In some cases, the reformulated recipe can contain more calories than the original. Research shows that diets high in sugar tend to be low in fat, and vice versa." She added:
"The key thing to remember is that sugars occur naturally in a wide range of foods - including fruit, vegetables and dairy products - and can be consumed within a healthy, balanced diet and active lifestyle. As always, balance and variety in a diet is the most important thing for people to remember."
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Too little gluten in our diet may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes

People with celiac disease or who are gluten intolerant may benefit from a low-gluten diet. A considerable number of people who do not have these diseases still adopt a gluten-free diet in the hope that it benefits their health. New research, however, suggests that a low-gluten diet may even have some adverse health effects, by raising the risk of diabetes



Gluten is a protein mainly found in wheat, barley, and rye, as well as baked goods and other foods that contain these cereals. People with celiac disease - an autoimmune disorder affecting at least 3 million people in the United States - avoid gluten because their immune system responds to it by attacking the small intestine.
However, more and more people are adopting a gluten-free diet, despite its health benefits being unclear.
In fact, some nutritionists advise against avoiding gluten. Instead, they recommend a well-balanced diet that includes fruit and vegetables, as well as whole-grain wheat and other foods containing gluten.
New research - presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle 2017 Scientific Sessions - suggests that a low-gluten diet may have adverse health effects by raising the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Studying the link between gluten consumption and type 2 diabetes

Geng Zong, Ph.D. - one of the study's authors and a research fellow in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, MA - explains the motivation behind the study:
"We wanted to determine if gluten consumption will affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten. Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more."
The team approximated the gluten consumption for 199,794 individuals enrolled in three long-term studies: the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) I and II, and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS).
As part of these studies, participants answered food frequency questionnaires every 2 to 4 years. Overall, participants consumed under 12 grams of gluten per day. The average daily consumption was 5.8 grams for the NHS I study, 6.8 grams for NHS II, and 7.1 grams for HPFS.
Researchers followed the participants for approximately 30 years, between 1984-1990 and 2010-2013.

People who consume more gluten 13 percent less likely to have diabetes

Throughout the 30-year follow-up period, 15,947 cases of type 2 diabetes were identified.
The study found that participants who had the highest gluten intake - up to 12 grams per day - had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes over the 30-year follow-up period. Those who ate less gluten also had a lower cereal fiber intake. Fiber is known to protect against type 2 diabetes.
After adjusting for the protective effect of fiber, participants in the upper 20 percent on the gluten consumption scale were 13 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes, compared with those on the opposite end of the scale - namely, those whose gluten intake was below 4 grams per day.
"People without celiac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes," says co-author Zong.
Limitations of the study include its observational nature, which means that it cannot establish causality, and the fact that more research is needed to confirm the findings. Additionally, the researchers did not include data from those who have eliminated gluten from their diet completely.

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High-dose vitamin C makes cancer treatment more effective, trial shows

In the 1970s and 1980s, Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling, together with surgeon Ewan Cameron, first hypothesized the clinical benefits of vitamin C for treating people with cancer.
Since then, further studies in animals and cancer cell cultures suggested that a high concentration of ascorbic acid might prevent and treat cancer.
More recent studies have examined the combined effect of high-dose vitamin C and conventional cancer treatment. Some of this research showed that patients who received the combined treatment had a slower progression of the disease, while others have suggested that the side effects of chemotherapy were less pronounced among those who also took high doses of vitamin C.
To obtain a high dose in these studies, vitamin C is usually administered using intravenous infusion. Vitamin C has a short half-life of only 2 hours in the human body, which is why it must be administered in high doses as a treatment.
A new clinical trial studies the effect of giving between 800 and 1,000 times the daily recommended dose of vitamin C to patients with brain and lung cancer.
The new research was led by scientists at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and the results were published in the journal Cancer Cell.

Vitamin C passes human safety trial

As part of the human safety trial, 11 patients with brain cancer who were undergoing standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy were also administered three weekly intravenous infusions of vitamin C for 2 months, and then two weekly infusions for 7 months.
Each infusion raised the patients' blood levels of vitamin C to 20,000 micromoles (μM). The average level of vitamin C in adults is approximately 70 μM.
Overall, the treatment was tolerated well. The team noted very few minor side effects, such as dry mouth or rare and brief episodes of high blood pressure.
This safety test was the first phase of a series of clinical trials that will investigate whether high-dose vitamin C can effectively increase the lifespan and quality of life for patients that are being treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
For now, the data from the phase I trial show that patients with glioblastoma survived for 4 to 6 months longer than the average survival time noticed in patients who undergo conventional treatment alone. Specifically, patients who also received high doses of ascorbic acid survived for 18 to 22 months compared with 14 to 16 months, which is the typical survival rate for glioblastoma.
For the upcoming phase II of the clinical trials, the scientists will examine the effects of vitamin C in participants with stage 4 lung cancer as well as in those with highly aggressive brain tumors, such as glioblastoma.

How vitamin C weakens cancer cells

The mechanism that might explain the potential efficacy of vitamin C in treating lung and brain cancer relates to the cancer cells' metabolism.
As a consequence of the faulty metabolism that occurs inside the cancer cells' mitochondria, these cells produce abnormally high levels of so-called redox active iron molecules. These molecules react with vitamin C and form hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen peroxide-derived free radicals.
Scientists think that these free radicals drive cancer cell death by damaging the cells' DNA. The free radicals are also thought to weaken the cancer cells and make them more vulnerable to radiation therapy and chemotherapy.
"This paper reveals a metabolic frailty in cancer cells that is based on their own production of oxidizing agents that allows us to utilize existing redox active compounds, like vitamin C, to sensitize cancer cells to radiation [therapy] and chemotherapy."
Garry Buettner, study co-author
Co-senior author Douglas Spitz also comments on the significance of the findings:
"This is a significant example of how knowing details of potential mechanisms and the basic science of redox active compounds in cancer versus normal cells can be leveraged clinically in cancer therapy," he explains. "Here, we verified convincingly that increased redox active metal ions in cancer cells were responsible for this differential sensitivity of cancer versus normal cells to very high doses of vitamin C."
If the approach proves effective in future clinical trials as well, the new treatment could also be significantly less costly than the standard treatment. To put this into perspective, 9 months of intravenous vitamin C treatment as part of the phase II trial currently costs less than one dose of chemotherapy.
"The majority of cancer patients we work with are excited to participate in clinical trials that could benefit future patient outcomes down the line. Results look promising but we are not going to know if this approach really improves therapy response until we complete these phase II trials." 
Bryan Allen, co-senior author